Making Sourdough Starter: Instructions and Videos

After making the videos demonstrating how to make a sourdough starter from scratch, I believe it will be useful to provide a summary and explaining further the process. In this post I would like to provide step by step instructions, provide all the videos in chronological order and share some resources where you can find great information on making sourdough bread.

Step by Step Instruction on Making Your Own Sourdough Starter

    1. Step one- Day One. Mix about two tablespoons of whole wheat flour with two tablespoons of “no sugar added” pineapple juice. Stir the mixture well, loosely cover the container and leave it out in a room temperature for 24 hours. Optionally you can stir the mixture every 6 hours to incorporate more air. You can watch the video of the first step in playlist embedded bellow.
    2. Step two – Day Two. Add one tablespoon of whole wheat flour and a tablespoon of pineapple juice to the mixture, stir well and leave it our in the room temperature for 48 hours. Optionally you can stir the mixture every 6 hours to incorporate more air. You can watch the video of the second step in playlist embedded bellow- click the “next” button in the player bellow to skip the first video.
    3. Step three – Day Four. Add one tablespoon of whole wheat flour and one tablespoon of water into the mixture and stir it well. During this step you might see some bubbles in your mixture and the mixture might have a yeasty aroma to it – a good sign your are going to be successful in making your own starter. Set aside the mixture for another 24 hours in the room temperature. You can watch the video of the third step in playlist embedded bellow- click the “next” button in the player bellow to skip the first two videos.
    4. Step Four – Day Five. By now you should have a starter that can be used for baking. It will be very bubbly and should have sour and yeasty aroma to it. There might not be enough starter for your first recipie so you might want to feed it one more time with 1/4 cup of flour and 1/4 cup of water. If by this time your mixture shows “no life” you need to discard the mixture to start the process all over again. This method of making sourdough starter has never failed me and I am confident it will work for you as well. Watch the list video in the player bellow to see how my starter looked.

Notes on storing and feeding your starter.
If you are not going to bake your bread every day, the best place for storing your starter is your refrigerator. When keeping your starter in the refrigerator feed it once a week by discarding half of the starter and replacing the discarded portion with equal amounts of water and flour. For example if you have 1 cup of starter and discard half of it, feed it with 1/4 cup of water and 1/4 cup of flour to replenish the discarded portion. Always use filtered or bottled water. Avoid the tap water as it may contain chlorine and may damage or even kill your starter.

Resources
There are many wonderful websites that provide great information and wonderful sourdough recipes. Two of such websites in my humble opinion stand above the rest.

    • Breadtopia – in addition to many wonderful recipes and videos about sourdough bread, this website also features a Baker’s Store. There you can buy sourdough starter, baking supplies and much more. A truly on stop destination for a beginner or a seasoned bread-maker alike.
    • The Fresh Loaf – is the second website I visit often. It has tons of information and it is more of a community driven website (forum) where users share their experience, pictures and recipes.

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